The Strategic of Cybersecurity Skills

The Strategic of Cybersecurity Skills

Evidence suggests there is a global cybersecurity skills shortage affecting businesses and governments alike, which means that organizations are struggling to fill their cybersecurity vacancies.

With the volume and severity of breaches increasing steadily in recent years, it’s unsurprising that businesses are now recognising the risk and responding accordingly. In fact, global security spending is predicted to reach $1.75 trillion by 2025. To many, this might seem like a positive step – but we need to consider where that money is going. Simply throwing money at the problem is a tactic frequently adopted by organisations, yet it’s proven to be ineffective and can end up making the problem worse. By deploying hundreds of disparate security products to tackle individual weaknesses, the business can become overwhelmed, and teams will miss the bigger picture.

 

The importance of workforce

Security awareness training usually takes a fixed approach where one cyber threat is tackled at a time. And rather than educating workers on how to best defend the company from threats, this training encourages them to simply recall facts from multiple choice questions that will be quickly forgotten after the course finishes. It bears no relevance to the role these workers will play in the midst of a crisis and treats them like vulnerabilities – not defensive assets.

Each member of the workforce has value to add. So instead of these outdated and ineffective methods, organisations need to focus on three simple factors to develop the cyber capabilities of their entire workforce: exercising, evidencing, and equipping. In other words: continually benchmark the knowledge, skills, and judgement of the workforce; demonstrate risk levels across all business functions by using data gathered from simulations; and use regular cyber exercises to plug any skill gaps. These criteria are critical.

New strategies needed to close the cyber security skills gap

Cyber criminals have exploited the security vacuum created by the shift from secure, centralised office IT systems to the vast constellation of personal devices as people worked from home. Cyber attacks rose 93% in the first half of 2021, compared to the same period last year – an astonishing figure given that 2020 was already breaking cyber crime records.
Cyber security challenges will only become more complex, which means we need to be proactive. It takes time to educate and train highly skilled professionals, and time to gain practical working experience.
If we are going to realistically meet these mounting challenges, we must find ways to bridge the cyber skills gap – by casting our nets wide and leaving no stone unturned, we can build a workforce that is capable of meeting the cyber security challenges of tomorrow.

See how Soffid can help you stay ahead of the curve in a rapidly evolving digital world. Share your requirements and a representative will follow up to discuss how Soffid can help secure your organization.

Sources: 
(1) computerweekly.com
(2) cybereason.comPicture:
<a href=’https://www.freepik.es/fotos/concepto’>Foto de concepto creado por Waewkidja – www.freepik.es</a>

 

Are passwords becoming a weak spot at companies?

Are passwords becoming a weak spot at companies?

Passwords are designed to give you access to an online world while protecting your information. However, with threats looming large, this first point of cybersecurity is becoming a weak spot that can involve dire consequences if unaddressed.

Relying on passwords for security has become increasingly problematic. Devising and remembering a complex password for every account and website is virtually impossible on your own. Yet using weak and simple passwords is a recipe for data breaches, account takeovers, and other forms of cyberattack.

Reports tell us about the situation…

For its report The misfortunate passwords of Fortune 500 companies, NordPass researchers analyzed data from public third-party breaches that affected Fortune 500 companies. The data included details from more than 15 million breaches across 17 different industries.

The researchers looked at the top 10 passwords used in each industry, the percentile of unique passwords, and the number of data breaches that hit each sector.

The word “password” is still being used and misused as the most common password across all industries, including retail and e-commerce, energy, technology, finances, and even IT and technology. Among other passwords in the top ten list, some common choices were “123456,” “Hello123,” and “sunshine.”

According to a Verizon report, more than 80 per cent of data breaches occur from weak or compromised passwords, creating the likelihood of an ongoing vulnerability regardless of how much technology is deployed to defeat hackers.

Certified cybersecurity. Multifactor authentication

Education and awareness are becoming more crucial in cyber security, especially in SMEs.

Two-factor authentication is great but you need to educate people about it because most employees complain about it.

The term “two-factor authentication” refers to a second step to confirm who you are. An additional layer of protection will, by default, provide more security than a single barrier.

The easiest way to “lock the door” on technology is employing multi-factor authentication. This security measure requires users to present at least two pieces of evidence before gaining access to a server, device, database or software program. A cybercriminal who has obtained a user’s login and password, for example, would still need to have access to that person’s unlocked cell phone or email to obtain a time-sensitive verification code.

 

See how Soffid can help you stay ahead of the curve in a rapidly evolving digital world. Share your requirements and a representative will follow up to discuss how Soffid can help secure your organization.

Avoiding cybersecurity threats

Avoiding cybersecurity threats

Cyber threats continue to grow. Even with people returning to the office, the rapid demand for us all to be present online has also led to a dangerous surge in cyberattacks, data breaches and fraudulent activity targeting individuals and businesses.

According to McAfee Enterprise, during the pandemic, 81% of global organizations experienced increased cybersecurity threats and 79% experienced downtime as a result of a cybersecurity incident. Preparation is key.

Training

One of the most common ways cyber criminals get access to your data is through your employees. They’ll send fraudulent emails impersonating someone in your organisation and will either ask for personal details or for access to certain files. Links often seem legitimate to an untrained eye and it’s easy to fall into the trap. This is why employee awareness is vital.

One of the most efficient ways to protect against cyber attacks and all types of data breaches is to train your employees on cyber attack prevention and inform them of current cyber attacks.

Keep your systems up to date

Often cyber attacks happen because your systems or software aren’t fully up to date, leaving weaknesses. Hackers exploit these weaknesses so cybercriminals exploit these weaknesses to gain access to your network. Once they are in – it’s often too late to take preventative action.

Control access to your system

It’s essential to control who has access to your computers. Having a perimeter security system installed is a very good way to stop cybercrime as much as break ins.

Access Management

Having managed admin rights and blocking your staff installing or even accessing certain data on your network is beneficial to your security.

Passwords

Having different passwords setup for every application you use is a real benefit to your security, and changing them often will maintain a high level of protection against external and internal threats.

 

Summary

Preventing a cyberattack is crucial for your business’s survival. It takes a lot of time, money, and effort to recover from a cyberattack, and you’ll need to work with the relevant authorities(opens in new tab) to resolve the issue and set up new systems to thwart future threats.

The business will suffer reputational damage if it loses customer data or fails to alert them early about a breach. Companies that rely on your business for their operations will also be hurt in the process.

 

Picture: <a href=’https://www.freepik.es/fotos/seguridad’>Foto de seguridad creado por rawpixel.com – www.freepik.es</a>